The Unstoppable Windows Hacking Device

Next in a long run of Windows hacks, we have a device that can not be blocked easily via software, and is fully customizable.  The Teensy 2.0 (purchased for $18 at www.pjrc.com) is an Arduino-like microcontroller that can be programmed to act as a keyboard once plugged in.  The device and vendor IDs can be changed at will, making it extremely difficult to block it as a single device.  (I, myself, have mine identifying as an Apple Pro Keyboard - as it requires no drivers in Linux, Mac OS X, or Windows - and doesn't queue off OS X to identify an unknown keyboard.)  There is an application out there that takes inventory of your USB devices and monitors for, and blocks, new devices - but unless you have this highly obscure program running, you are likely to to fall victim to this device.

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Hacking the U3 into a Switchblade on Windows Vista and Windows 7

Straight out of the hak5 wiki, I've been trying to build my own USB Switchblade. Unfortunately, at the time of the episode, the best we had was Windows XP. Well, time has passed, things have changed, and I'm sitting on a Windows 7 box (honestly, I only use it for gaming), and I no longer have an XP box in the house. The instructions for creating a Switchblade involve running a utility that reflashes your U3 capable USB thumbdrive with a custom .iso that includes all your fun tools. Unfortunately, Windows Vista and Windows 7 operate quite a bit differently than Windows XP, and the utility that reflashes your pen drive complains that "you can only update one U3 compatible device at a time," and that you should "unplug all other devices." Fortunately, I have found a solution.

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Modlog – a BASH modular logger

Introduction

This summer, I had the good fortune to spend several months working at the University of Michigan. One of the tasks assigned to me was devising a method for data collection over time for certain types of data. In particular, we were looking to collect information from /proc/meminfo and out of our lm_sensors output.

The issue that we came across with logging these sets of data was that they were set up for one-time viewing. That is, they looked similar to the following: Continue reading

Remove the NFL app from the Pre

Introduction

Ever since the Palm Pre came out, there has been a dull uproar over the inability to remove certain apps, specifically the NASCAR app that nobody seems to use. A typical downloaded application can be removed by pressing [orange] while tapping on the application icon. A dialog will pop up that gives you the option to delete the application. Unfortunately, this option does not exist for the NASCAR application, and now Sprint has decided to plague us with a second useless application: the NFL app.

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Removing the NASCAR app from your Palm Pre

Introduction

Ever since the Palm Pre came out, there has been a dull uproar over the inability to remove certain apps, specifically the NASCAR app that nobody seems to use. A typical downloaded application can be removed by pressing [orange] while tapping on the application icon. A dialog will pop up that gives you the option to delete the application. Unfortunately, this option does not exist for the NASCAR application. Continue reading